Combai

origin-iconOrigin:  India

group-iconDog Breed Group: Hunting Dog

life-iconLife Span: 12-15 years

weight-iconWeight: Male: 32-32.5, Female: 30-30.5

height-iconHeight: Male: 23-24.5, Female: 20-22.5

Origin of Name:   The Combai is a breed of sighthound native to Tamil Nadu in Southern India.

Combai Dog Breed
SizeTemperamentSheddingDroolingMonthly keeping cost
Large Zero
High
Negligible
Hair Everywhere
Zero
Excess
Premium*Standard*

About Combai

  • Life Span*12-15 years
  • Getting a puppy homeExpensive
  • Popularity
    Star Super star
  • Availability
    Rare Easy to get
Introduction

Cambai is a multi-purpose Working Dog from southern India, which is particularly the region of Tamil Nadu. Originally developed by the Indian royalty to hunt bears and other large and dangerous animals, in recent centuries the breed has primarily served as a Guard Dog for farmers in rural areas. Kodai is in the most conspicuous search of all Indian Hunting Dogs due to a ridge of fur, which grows in the opposite direction to that found in the rest of the body. Cambai is now a very rare breed even in its native India, and most experts believe it is on the verge of extinction. This breed is also known as Indian bear hound, Indian bear dog, Tamil bear hound, Tamil bear dog, and alternate spelling kombai.

History

Combai was developed long before the written record of Indian dog breeding, and much of the breed's history has been lost over time. In fact, almost anything said about the lineage of this breed is little more than speculation. This can be said to ensure that the breed has existed since at least the 15th century and has always been mainly associated with the region of South India now known as Tamil Nadu, where it is traditionally Form used to hunt bears and other large mammals. Many locals believe that the breed was actually developed by the Marwa kings in 800 (also known as Marwar and / or Marvan) as their royal Hunting Dog, but these claims support Cannot be corroborated without more evidence.

Although there is not enough evidence to make any real decision to the best of his ability, there are several theories that can explain the descent of Kambai. Most believe the breed descended from other Indian lighthouses. This breed is probably more similar to those breeds than any other dogs, and was used for a similar purpose. Given the protective disposition of the breed, some broad heads, and black masks, it is also quite possible that the Conde was developed from Mastiff-type dogs or Mastiff / Sethound crosses. Combai could also be selectively banned from pariah dogs such as dingoes found in India. The hairy ridge on the dog's back strongly suggests that it is somehow related to the Thai ridgeback and / or Khyosan dogs that gave birth to the Rhodesian ridgeback, but the relationship between these breeds is unclear and does not exist at all. Can. Given the age of Cambai and the fact that Indian sailors and merchants had regular contact with both Southeast Asia and East Africa in previous centuries, Cambai are more likely to be ancestors of other bitten dogs by contrast. In the opinion of this writer, Kodai was developed by possibly crossing eighth, mastiff-type dogs and other Indian breeds simultaneously.

For many centuries, the Kodai were kept mainly by the nobility of southern India, who mainly used the breed as Hunting Dogs. Unlike breeds like Chippiparai and Rajapalayam, which specialized in hunting rabbits, gazelles, game birds, and other swift-footed game, codai was mainly used to hunt threatened species. The primary quarry of the breed was always the sloth bear (Ursus urinus), which at one time was very common throughout India. The breed was so skilled at bear hunting that it came to be known as a bear dog or bear hunter. Although bears were a specialty of Kambai, this versatile and fierce predator was regularly used on all major game species, which were native to the region, including lions, tigers, and leopards. The success of the breed in hunting some of the most dangerous organisms found on Earth greatly appreciated it and benefited the Cambay spread over the southern part of the Indian subcontinent. At one point, the breed was numerous throughout the region, although it was always the most common in Tamil Nadu.

As the centuries passed, the Indian nobility gradually lost a large part of its power, wealth and prestige, a process which was greatly accelerated by conquest. Kambai actually played an important role in the British subjugation of his motherland. The famous Marudhu Pandiar Bandhu, the ruler of Tamil Nadu, Sivavangai, who was the first Indian to issue a formal declaration of independence from British rule in 1801, used the breed extensively in his armed resistance to colonial power. Although, the Marudhu Pandiar brothers were ultimately defeated, they are long remembered, as they have dogs that they used. As Indian nobility steadily weakened, Kambai found a new group of staunch Indian rural farmers. Those same traits made Combai a fierce and devoted hunter of the dangerous game, making the breed a loyal and fearless Guard Dog. Farmers kept Kambai on their properties to protect themselves and their families from wildlife, especially fearing tigers and leopards. Although predators on large lands are now on the verge of extinction in India, at one time they were a constant and very real threat. The British Raj estimated that tigers alone killed around 100,000 people in India between 1800 and 1900, and were not among other major predators such as lions, leopards, hyenas, wolves and dholes. The ever-vigilant Kombai barks loudly to alert the lord of his predator's presence and then tries to scare the animal. If the animal was still determined to attack, Kodai would attack him and attempt to drive him away. When confronted with a creature that would not flee, Nirbhay Kodai fought on his own until one or both of the animals died or his master came to assist in the conflict, Till then kept fighting. As most Indian farmers could

The song spends keeping a dog, Kodai usually worked alone. However, breed is most affected when kept in small groups. Combai was developed long before the written record of Indian dog breeding, and much of the breed's history has been lost over time. In fact, almost anything said about the lineage of this breed is little more than speculation. This can be said to ensure that the breed has existed since at least the 15th century and has always been mainly associated with the region of South India now known as Tamil Nadu, where it is traditionally Form used to hunt bears and other large mammals. Many locals believe that the breed was actually developed by the Marwa kings in 800 (also known as Marwar and / or Marvan) as their royal Hunting Dog, but these claims support Cannot be corroborated without more evidence.

Although there is not enough evidence to make any real decision to the best of his ability, there are several theories that can explain the descent of Kambai. Most believe the breed descended from other Indian lighthouses. This breed is probably more similar to those breeds than any other dogs, and was used for a similar purpose. Given the protective disposition of the breed, some broad heads, and black masks, it is also quite possible that the Conde was developed from Mastiff-type dogs or Mastiff / Sethound crosses. Combai could also be selectively banned from pariah dogs such as dingoes found in India. The hairy ridge on the dog's back strongly suggests that it is somehow related to the Thai ridgeback and / or Khyosan dogs that gave birth to the Rhodesian ridgeback, but the relationship between these breeds is unclear and does not exist at all. Can. Given the age of Cambai and the fact that Indian sailors and merchants had regular contact with both Southeast Asia and East Africa in previous centuries, Cambai are more likely to be ancestors of other bitten dogs by contrast. In the opinion of this writer, Kodai was developed by possibly crossing eighth, mastiff-type dogs and other Indian breeds simultaneously.

For many centuries, the Kodai were kept mainly by the nobility of southern India, who mainly used the breed as Hunting Dogs. Unlike breeds like Chippiparai and Rajapalayam, which specialized in hunting rabbits, gazelles, game birds, and other swift-footed game, codai was mainly used to hunt threatened species. The primary quarry of the breed was always the sloth bear (Ursus urinus), which at one time was very common throughout India. The breed was so skilled at bear hunting that it came to be known as a bear dog or bear hunter. Although bears were a specialty of Kambai, this versatile and fierce predator was regularly used on all major game species, which were native to the region, including lions, tigers, and leopards. The success of the breed in hunting some of the most dangerous organisms found on Earth greatly appreciated it and benefited the Cambay spread over the southern part of the Indian subcontinent. At one point, the breed was numerous throughout the region, although it was always the most common in Tamil Nadu.

As the centuries passed, the Indian nobility gradually lost a large part of its power, wealth and prestige, a process which was greatly accelerated by conquest. Kambai actually played an important role in the British subjugation of his motherland. The famous Marudhu Pandiar Bandhu, the ruler of Tamil Nadu, Sivavangai, who was the first Indian to issue a formal declaration of independence from British rule in 1801, used the breed extensively in his armed resistance to colonial power. Although, the Marudhu Pandiar brothers were ultimately defeated, they are long remembered, as they have dogs that they used. As Indian nobility steadily weakened, Kambai found a new group of staunch Indian rural farmers. Those same traits made Combai a fierce and devoted hunter of the dangerous game, making the breed a loyal and fearless Guard Dog. Farmers kept Kambai on their properties to protect themselves and their families from wildlife, especially fearing tigers and leopards. Although predators on large lands are now on the verge of extinction in India, at one time they were a constant and very real threat. The British Raj estimated that tigers alone killed around 100,000 people in India between 1800 and 1900, and were not among other major predators such as lions, leopards, hyenas, wolves and dholes. The ever-vigilant Kombai barks loudly to alert the lord of his predator's presence and then tries to scare the animal. If the animal was still determined to attack, Kodai would attack him and attempt to drive him away. When confronted with a creature that would not flee, Nirbhay Kodai fought on his own until one or both of the animals died or his master came to assist in the conflict, Till then kept fighting. As most Indian farmers could

The song spends keeping a dog, Kodai usually worked alone. However, breed is most affected when kept in small groups. Cambai developed to a large extent as a result of natural selection. Only the fiercest and strongest examples can fight a tiger and live to pass on their genes to the next generation. The breed developed a tremendous resistance to heat to the extent that Kambai could work for hours in temperatures that would kill most dogs in minutes. Perhaps most importantly, combai developed a natural resistance to diseases and parasites that are prevalent in southern India. This breed became so well adapted to life in its homeland that it flourished in a place where many breeds perish within weeks. Some Indian breeders artificially selected breeding partners for their combis, although keeping or tying them ensured that the breed remained relatively pure.

General Appearance

Because the combi is not bred to a unified standard, it is often crossbred with other dogs, showing a much greater variation in combi appearance among modern breeds. In fact, it is very difficult to make anything other than a very loose generalization about the presence of the breed. Cambai is a medium-sized breed, although the actual height and weight of individual dogs vary greatly. This breed has a very natural appearance and lacks any characteristics that will affect its ability to function or survive. The Kodai is an incredibly muscular and athletic breed, but should always look lean and fit rather than sticky or heavy. Some individuals are made like a cathalla leopard dog while some are made like a borzoi. The tail of the kambai is quite variable, moving from medium to long and straight to fully in a straight circle above the back.

The head and face of the cambai are relatively narrow, but much wider than most lighthouses. The muzzle and skull of this breed are usually not completely separated and blend very easily with each other. The muzzle is quite long, usually at least as long as the skull, and usually a little from base to tip. Although not particularly widespread, the kambai's snout is generally much wider and more powerful than most similar breeds. Kambai's ears are also very variable. They usually either fall below the sides of the head or bend backwards, but many individuals have different ears or also have two separate ears.

Kodai's coat is probably the defining feature of the breed, and is in fact what distinguishes the breed from other Indian dogs. Like most Indian dogs, the Kodai have a short, smooth coat that both keeps the breed cool in the Indian sun and allows it to easily find and kill the parasites. The coat is generally uniform in length over the entire body, but is often slightly shorter on the fronts of the head, face, and feet. The most important feature of the coat is a distinctive ridge of hair along the top of the back that grows in a different direction from the rest of the coat. This ridge is very similar to that found on Rhodesian and Thai ridgebacks, although it is not often as pronounced or as large. Kodai varies greatly in terms of coloration, but most breed members are predominantly red, tan, or brown. Most breed members are significantly darker on the back and sides than the chest and underbelly. A large number of breed members have black masks covering their masks and black markings on their ears, but some do not have these markings. Many combi also have white markings on the chest, underbelly and legs, although this is less common with black masks.

Pros - Cons
Pros
This breed is healthy, does not require a lot of grooming and are healthy
Cons
This breed is prone to allergies, has seperation anxiety and is not apartment friendy
Breeding

The gestation period in lasts for 60-64 days The primary period of the reproductive cycle of the female is called Proestrus and goes on for around 9 days. During this time the females begin to draw in males. The subsequent part is the Estrus when the bitch is receptive to the male. It goes on for around 3 to 11 days. The third part is the Diestrus. Usually, it happens around day 14. In this period the bitch's discharge changes for distinctive red and reaching its end. The vulva gets back to average, and she will no longer allow mating. The fourth part called the Anestrus. The time span between heat periods ordinarily keeps going around a half year. The litter size ranges between 6 to 8 puppies at a time.

Combai Grooming

Cambai is a very low-maintenance breed. This breed sometimes does not require professional grooming, only an occasional brushing. In addition, only those routine maintenance procedures are required, which all breeds require tail clipping and ear cleaning. There is no report of shedding of Cambay. It is probably safe to assume that the cambai sheds, though almost certainly very lightly.

Combai Training

This breed is quite intelligent, but also independent and often stubborn, so they can be a challenge to train. They like to give and receive affection and do their best with positive, reward-based training. They are sensitive and will not react well to harsh orders or punishments. Patience and consistency are important. They have an excellent sense of smell as well as a strong hunting drive. Because they were bred to concentrate and to follow a trail without distraction, they may not always pay attention to you if they are busy with something more interesting.

Combai Nutrition

This breed is classified as ""somewhat active"", but is average. Long segments of quiet activity are often spread with brief bursts of high activity, often simply moving around the house or yard. In addition to walking, daily play sessions are required. Another dog can be a good exercise partner, but they will still need quality playtime with his owner. A fence-backed backyard is a good idea; Bichons are surprisingly fast, and if someone makes a dash for freedom, it can be difficult to catch or call you back. They enjoy obedience, agility and participating in rally competitions.

Combai Exercise

They should perform well on high-quality dog ​​food, whether it is commercially manufactured or prepared with the supervision and approval of your vet. Any diet should be appropriate for the age of the dog (puppy, adult or senior). Some dogs are at risk of being overweight, so watch your dog's calorie consumption and weight level. Treatment training can be an important aid, but giving too much can lead to obesity. Know which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. If you have any concerns about your dog's weight or diet, check with your vet. Clean, freshwater must be available at all times.

Combai Health

It does not appear that any health studies have been conducted on Cambay, making it impossible to make a definitive statement on the health of the breed. Most fundamentalists believe that the breed is in excellent health, and it does not appear that Kodai suffers from any genetically inherited condition at a high rate. In fact, this breed is known to be incredibly resistant to disease and parasites, which is a necessity for native dogs for tropics. Other ridgeback breeds such as Rhodesian Ridgeback and Thai Ridgeback are known as acutely painful and often fatal spinal dermoid sinuses. However, this condition does not appear to have been recorded in combai. No reliable life expectancy figures are shown on Cambay, but anything that exists will probably be highly skewed by the fact that dogs in India live on average many years less than western dogs that provide better diet and veterinary care.

Although skeletal and visual problems are not thought of in this breed at high rates it is advisable for owners to keep their pets by both the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) and the Canine Eye Registration Foundation (CERF) Do the test. OFA and CERF perform genetic and other tests before identifying potential health defects. This is particularly valuable in detecting conditions that do not appear until the dog has reached an advanced age, it is especially important for anyone considering breeding their dog , Which has tested them to prevent the spread of potential genetic conditions to their offspring.

Although health studies have not been done for Cambay, a number have been on similar and closely related breeds. Some of Hound's biggest concerns in those breeds include:

  • Dermoid sinus
  • Anesthesia Allergy
  • Sensitivity to anesthesia
  • cold intolerance
  • Intolerance to hard surfaces
  • food allergies
  • hip dysplasia
  • Elbow dysplasia
  • Patella / Patellar Luxation Luxing
  • Progressive retinal atrophy / PRA
  • Demodicosis / Demodex mange / Demodectic mange