Hokkaido

origin-iconOrigin:  Japan

group-iconDog Breed Group: Working Dog

life-iconLife Span: 12-15 years

weight-iconWeight: Male: 25-30, Female: 20-28

height-iconHeight: Male: 18-20, Female: 18-19

Origin of Name:   The Hokkaido is one of the oldest of the six native Japanese spitz breeds.

Hokkaido Dog Breed
SizeTemperamentSheddingDroolingMonthly keeping cost
Large Zero
High
Negligible
Hair Everywhere
Zero
Excess
Premium*Standard*

About Hokkaido

  • Life Span*12-15 years
  • Getting a puppy homeAverage
  • Popularity
    Star Super star
  • Availability
    Rare Easy to get
Introduction

Hokkaido is a medium-sized, strongly built dog. They have longer, thicker coats than other Japanese breeds, and also have wider chests and shorter ears. Like all Nihon Canes, they have a double coat that is made of protective, thick outer guard hair, and a fine, thick undercoat that is shed seasonally. The breed comes in many colors: white, red, black, halter, sesame and wolf gray. With early training, Hokkaido is a very loyal and devoted companion who wants to please his human family. They are incredibly intelligent thinkers and problem solvers, and they excel in the tasks assigned to them. If not socialized properly, Hokkaido can be wary of strangers and protect their families. The breed is extremely rare outside its country of origin. In Japan, there is an estimated population of about 10,000–12,000, and annual registrations are between 1,000–1000.

History

Hokkaido is one of six native Japanese spitz breeds, including akita, sheeba inu, kai ken, shikoku, and kishu ken. They are said to have originated from medium-sized Japanese dogs that came with the Ainu people from Hokkaido to the main island of Honshu in Japan during the Kamakura era in the 1140s, when exchanges between Hokkaido and Tohoku District developed.

Over time, the Ainu people and their dogs adapted to survive the severely cold winter climate and rugged landscape. The dogs were revered by the Ainu people for their devout loyalty, bravery and ability to hunt big game. Bear and deer were hunters by Ainu culture, and their livelihood depended on their famous bear dogs.

In 1937 Hokkaido was classified as a living natural monument by the Government of Japan. There are two main breed registries: Hokkaido Ken Hozokai (Hokkaido Dog Conservation Society) and Hokkaido Ken Kyokai (Hokkaido Dog Association). There are almost no Hokkaido registered outside of these two clubs.

General Appearance

The Ainu Cane is a typical medium-sized dog (Shika Inu) of square shape – slightly taller than those at the withers. He has a muscular and compact body covered with a waterproof double coat. As usual, the undercoat is soft and dense and the outer coat is straight and hard. The Hokkaido dog has a slightly longer and thicker coat than other Japanese dogs and because of this is able to withstand extremely low temperatures and work efficiently in heavy snow or blizzards. However, as you probably guessed, the coat of the Ainu Ken requires a bit more grooming than the coats of other Japanese dog breeds. For example, you should generally brush your dog at least twice a week to prevent mats of hair from forming. Ainu Inu shed heavily. So, while shedding, you need to brush your dog once or twice a day to remove the dead hair. In addition, from time to time it is welcome to take a bath with dry shampoo. The main Hokkaido dog colors are white, black, red, black and tan, teal, wolf-gray, and brindle. The most common red and white dogs are

Pros - Cons
Pros
This breed makes for great watchdogs are dog friendly and kids friendly
Cons
This breed is prone to allergies, is not apartment friendly and needs a lot of grooming
Breeding

The gestation period in lasts for 60-64 days The primary period of the reproductive cycle of the female is called Proestrus and goes on for around 9 days. During this time the females begin to draw in males. The subsequent part is the Estrus when the bitch is receptive to the male. It goes on for around 3 to 11 days. The third part is the Diestrus. Usually, it happens around day 14. In this period the bitch's discharge changes for distinctive red and reaching its end. The vulva gets back to average, and she will no longer allow mating. The fourth part called the Anestrus. The time span between heat periods ordinarily keeps going around a half year. The litter size ranges between 6 to 8 puppies at a time.

Hokkaido Grooming

Hokkaido is a fairly self-managed breed. Natural oils on their skin and coat help to keep them clean and dry despite adverse weather. Their fur trimming or shaving is not required or recommended, just regular brushing to remove dead fur and keep the coat healthy. Hokkaido blows their undercoat twice a year. During this time, it is necessary to bathe and brush continuously to remove dead fur. Their nails should be trimmed regularly to avoid overgrowth and cracks. The teeth should be brushed regularly.

Hokkaido Training

As with all breeds, initial socialization and puppy training classes are recommended. This breed has a reputation for being difficult to house. However, in every other case, it is very easy to train them. For example, They like to perform tricks and learn new ones quickly. They respond very well to training based on positive rewards rather than harsh or negative methods. This breed is required to live with his family and is likely to result in undesirable behaviour if he is regularly left alone for long periods of time.

Hokkaido Nutrition

Hokkaido is generally a very active breed. They are best suited for an active family, who enjoy their time hiking, biking, jogging and / or camping. Like all working breeds, it is best to give them a "job" to do. Hokkaido excels at performance events such as agility, rally, flyball, weight bridge, luring, dock diving, and more. Without proper physical and mental stimulation, Hokkaido can cause boredom, anxiety and hyperactivity in your home. If you let your Hokkaido walk in your backyard, you should have a six-foot fence, as they are good jumpers. For daily walks, a strong strap and properly fitted martingale collar or harness is recommended.

Hokkaido Exercise

Hokkaido is generally a very active breed. They are best suited for an active family, who enjoy their time hiking, biking, jogging and / or camping. Like all working breeds, it is best to give them a "job" to do. Hokkaido excels at performance events such as agility, rally, flyball, weight bridge, luring, dock diving, and more. Without proper physical and mental stimulation, Hokkaido can cause boredom, anxiety and hyperactivity in your home. If you let your Hokkaido walk in your backyard, you should have a six-foot fence, as they are good jumpers. For daily walks, a strong strap and properly fitted martingale collar or harness is recommended.

Hokkaido Health

Hokkaido is an active breed that needs a high quality diet of balanced protein, fat, and carbohydrates. What you feed your dog is a personal choice, but working with your vet and / or breeder will be the best way to determine the frequency of feeding as a puppy and the best adult diet to increase longevity. . Properly fed Hokkaido must have a thick, shiny coat and clean teeth. Clean, fresh water must be available at all times.