Treeing Tennessee Brindle

origin-iconOrigin:  United States

group-iconDog Breed Group: Hunting Dog

life-iconLife Span: 10-12 years

weight-iconWeight: Male: 16-23, Female: 14-20

height-iconHeight: Male: 22-24, Female: 16-20

Origin of Name:   The Treeing Tennessee Brindle's development began in the early 1960s with the efforts of Reverend Earl Phillips.

Treeing Tennessee Brindle Dog Breed
SizeTemperamentSheddingDroolingMonthly keeping cost
Medium Zero
High
Negligible
Hair Everywhere
Zero
Excess
Premium*Standard*

About Treeing Tennessee Brindle

  • Life Span*10-12 years
  • Getting a puppy homeAverage
  • Popularity
    Star Super star
  • Availability
    Rare Easy to get
Introduction

The plantation originated in the Tennessee Brindle United States, particularly in the Appalachian and surrounding areas of the Ozark Mountains. They are bred from curvy dogs, have great scent power, an open trailer with good sound, and retain the unique ability to tree all kinds of game. Brindle-colored, small in size, and with short ears, they differ in structure compared to plots. The Treeing Tennessee Brindles are a very intelligent, adventurous and companion breed. Cautious, agile and sharp, they make for amazing Hunting Dogs.

History

In the words of Rev. Earl Phillips, founder of Treeing Tennessee Brindle Breeders: ""Our original breeding stock came from excellent Brindle Tree dogs from every part of the country."" Many came from the Appalachian Mountains, the Ozark Mountains, and beach locations.

In the early 1960s, the Rev. Earl Phillips wrote a column for a national Hunting Dog magazine. Through his journal column, Rev. Phillips collected information about these brindle-colored cue dogs and the people who knew or knew about them. Those who corresponded with Rev. Phillips praised these brindle taxing dogs for their hunting and tree planting abilities. There was a group that was trying to promote curb dogs of different colors, but no one was specifically trying to find, preserve, and promote dogs with brindles.

In early 1967, Rev. Phillips brindled and contacted several people about dogs. He suggested the formation of an organization to protect and promote these dogs. On March 21, 1967, the Treeing Tennessee Brindle Breeders Association was formed and recognized as a legal organization by the state of Illinois. The purpose of this association is to breed small-sized dog brindles in color, with short ears, and in a structure different from the plot. The dog may have dew claws and white legs and breasts. By selective breeding, this dog can have great smelling power, have an open trailer with good sound, and can retain the dog's great supernatural ability by doing Old Brindle to tree all kinds of game.

General Appearance

The Treeing Tennessee Brindle dog breed is a medium-sized Cur. The Treeing Tennessee Brindle's coat is short, dense, and soft. The breed can be either brindle or black with brindle trim. Sometimes they may have small white markings on their chest and legs. The legs are round and well arched. The dewclaws of their long, muscular legs are usually removed. The dog breed has a deep chest, a muscular neck and a well proportioned body. The tail is thick at the base and tapers towards the tip. Their muzzle is slightly broad and long with strong jaws. The breed has a flat and broad skull that curves towards the muzzle. The Treeing Tennessee Brindle's cheeks are muscular and the lips are hard with a scissor bite. The breed has tassel ears, which are V-shaped. The eyes are brown (dark or amber) and the nose is black in colour. This agile dog has a smooth and smooth gait.

Pros - Cons
Pros
This breed is intelliegnt, healthy and are low sheddars
Cons
This breed is prone to allergies, not apartment friendly and need a lot of maintainence
Breeding

The gestation period in lasts for 60-64 days The primary period of the reproductive cycle of the female is called Proestrus and goes on for around 9 days. During this time the females begin to draw in males. The subsequent part is the Estrus when the bitch is receptive to the male. It goes on for around 3 to 11 days. The third part is the Diestrus. Usually, it happens around day 14. In this period the bitch's discharge changes for distinctive red and reaching its end. The vulva gets back to average, and she will no longer allow mating. The fourth part called the Anestrus. The time span between heat periods ordinarily keeps going around a half year. The litter size ranges between 6 to 8 puppies at a time'

Treeing Tennessee Brindle Grooming

The breed's short-haired, smooth coat requires weekly brushing with a soft bristle brush or hound gloves. Beyond regular weekly grooming, occasional bathing will keep your treeing Tennessee brindle clean and show its best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. Fast growing strong nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splits, and cracks. The ears should be examined regularly to avoid the formation of wax and debris, which may result in infection. The teeth should be brushed regularly.

Treeing Tennessee Brindle Training

As with all breeds, initial socialization and puppy training classes are recommended. This breed has a reputation for being difficult to house. However, in every other case, it is very easy to train them. For example, They like to perform tricks and learn new ones quickly. They respond very well to training based on positive rewards rather than harsh or negative methods. This breed is required to live with his family and is likely to result in undesirable behaviour if he is regularly left alone for long periods of time.

Treeing Tennessee Brindle Nutrition

Plantation Tennessee brindles require regular exercise to keep them healthy and fit, both physically and mentally. Exercise options include playing time in the backyard, preferably fencing, or taking walks several times a day. Exercise can also come in the form of indoor activities, such as hide-and-seek, chasing a ball rolling on the floor, or learning new tricks. Some outdoor activities such as swimming, hiking, or retrieving balls or flying discs can provide a good outlet for spending energy. Training for dog sports such as agility, obedience and rally can also be a great way to give your dog exercise.

Treeing Tennessee Brindle Exercise

Treeing Tennessee Brindle should perform well on high quality dog ​​food, whether it is commercially manufactured or prepared at home with the supervision and approval of your vet. Any diet should be appropriate for the age of the dog (puppy, adult, or senior). Some dogs are at risk of being overweight, so watch your dog's calorie consumption and weight levels. Treatment training can be an important aid, but giving too much can lead to obesity. Know which human foods are safe for dogs and which are not. Contact your vet if you have any concerns about your dog's weight or diet. Clean, fresh water must be available at all times.

Treeing Tennessee Brindle Health

Some dogs may face health challenges in their lives, but most treeing Tennessee brindles are healthy dogs. Working with a responsible breeder, prospective owners can obtain the education necessary to learn about specific health concerns within the breed.