Welsh Terrier

origin-iconOrigin:  United Kingdom (Wales)

group-iconDog Breed Group: Hunting Dog

life-iconLife Span: 12-14 years

weight-iconWeight: Male: 5-6, Female: 5-5.5

height-iconHeight: Male: 12-15, Female: 11-14

Origin of Name:   The Welsh Terrier originates from Wales and was originally bred for hunting fox, rodents and badger.

Welsh Terrier Dog Breed
SizeTemperamentSheddingDroolingMonthly keeping cost
Small Zero
High
Negligible
Hair Everywhere
Zero
Excess
Premium*Standard*

About Welsh Terrier

  • Life Span*12-14 years
  • Getting a puppy homeExpensive
  • Popularity
    Star Super star
  • Availability
    Rare Easy to get
Introduction

Sturdy, compact and rugged, a tight-fitting black-and-tan coat and a rectangular head with twisted ears and a pale beard, Welsh is built with the classic lines of Britain's long-legged terrier . They stand about 15 at the shoulder, slightly larger than the Lakeland Terrier but much smaller than the mighty Aredale. However, the three breeds share a family resemblance: an ancient breed called the Old English Black and Tan Terrier is believed to be the grandfather of these and some other British terriers.

History

It is impossible to say when the Welsh Terrier came into existence, but the breed as we know it was taking shape in the 1700s. They were raised in the remote mountainous region of North Wales to hunt foxes, otters and badgers. The Welsh Terriers, with their powerful headquarters and punitive jaws, were equipped for the task of going face-to-face with sharp-toothed, razor-clawed prey, with conspicuous terrier courage. Badgers, in particular, are dangerous adversaries, and digging them from their lair was no work for sissy dogs.

General Appearance

The Welsh Terrier is a strong, compact, rugged dog of medium size with a thick wire-textured coat. The legs, underbody, and head are tan; Jacket black (or sometimes brown). The tail is docked lengthwise to complete the image of a "square dog", which is almost as tall as it is tall. The movement is a terrier trot typical of a long-legged terrier. It is easy, with good accessibility and drive. The Welsh Terrier is friendly, outgoing for people and other dogs, showing emotion and courage. The "Welsh Terrier expression" comes from the set, color, and condition of the eyes combined with the use of the ears.

Pros - Cons
Pros
This breed is easy to train, kid friendly and apartment friendly
Cons
This breed is prone to allergies, requires a lot of grooming and is not cat friendly
Breeding

The gestation period in lasts for 60-64 days The primary period of the reproductive cycle of the female is called Proestrus and goes on for around 9 days. During this time the females begin to draw in males. The subsequent part is the Estrus when the bitch is receptive to the male. It goes on for around 3 to 11 days. The third part is the Diestrus. Usually, it happens around day 14. In this period the bitch's discharge changes for distinctive red and reaching its end. The vulva gets back to average, and she will no longer allow mating. The fourth part called the Anestrus. The time span between heat periods ordinarily keeps going around a half year. The litter size ranges between 6 to 8 puppies at a time'

Welsh Terrier Grooming

The Welsh terrier's coat of care is similar to that of other broken-coated terriers. Hair can be broken by hand, which is commonly called hand stripping. This type of grooming is a continuous process and an art that takes years to master. Pet grooming is not complicated for the Welsh Terrier. The dog should be bitten every 8 to 12 weeks, leaving the coat longer in cold weather. Nails should be cut at least weekly, and the dog should be brushed once or twice a week. It is usually not necessary to bathe between the clippings, but if so, use a good shampoo that contains a moisturizer.

Welsh Terrier Training

Welsh terriers are friendly and outgoing, but puppies need to be socialized enough by their owners to encourage polite behavior around other dogs. All Welsh should be taught to be in control and tolerant of other dogs while walking on lead. A lot of exercise and meditation help this energetic dog become the affectionate, well-behaved companion he was born to.

Welsh Terrier Nutrition

Welsh terriers are high-energy dogs. They enjoy doing activities with their boss such as playing ball or catching flying discs in a fenced yard. They should have plenty of time to walk in an enclosed area, as well as a long walk every day. Once the dog becomes an adult, and only when it is in good health

Welsh Terrier Exercise

The Welsh Terrier should perform well on high quality dog ​​food, whether it is commercially manufactured or prepared at home with the supervision and approval of your vet. Any diet should be appropriate for the age of the dog (puppy, adult, or senior). Some dogs are at risk of being overweight, so watch your dog's calorie consumption and weight level. Treatment training can be an important aid, but giving too much can lead to obesity. Know which human foods are safe for dogs and which are not. Contact your vet if you have any concerns about your dog's weight or diet. Clean, fresh water must be available at all times.

Welsh Terrier Health

Welsh puppies are generally hardy, grow with regular care, and do not look fragile like many other puppies. Welsh reaching 15 to 18 years of age are not uncommon, but the average lifespan seems to be 12 to 14. Responsible breeders screened their stock for health conditions such as allergy problems, hip dysplasia, and Lage – Calve – Perthes disease.

Recommended health tests from the National Breed Club:

  • Ppl dna test