Wirehaired Vizsla

origin-iconOrigin:  Hungary

group-iconDog Breed Group: Gun Dog

life-iconLife Span: 12-14 years

weight-iconWeight: Male: 25-30, Female: 20.5-25

height-iconHeight: Male: 23-25, Female: 22-23

Origin of Name:   The Wirehaired Vizsla is a rare dog breed in Hungary.

Wirehaired Vizsla
SizeTemperamentSheddingDroolingMonthly keeping cost
Medium Zero
High
Negligible
Hair Everywhere
Zero
Excess
Premium*Standard*

About Wirehaired Vizsla

  • Life Span*12-14 years
  • Getting a puppy homeAverage
  • Popularity
    Star Super star
  • Availability
    Rare Easy to get
Introduction

Wirehaired Vizslas are close relatives of Vizslas but are of a different breed. The main distinguishing feature is the coat type. Unlike Sleek Wizsla, WVs have a thick wiry coat, with a shaggy beard and eyebrows setting a bright, vibrant expression. Both breeds Vizsla are classified as medium-sized, but an ideal WV would stand a shade taller and be slightly heavier than its smooth-coat cousin. The two breeds share the same striking red color (golden-rust), with noses and eyes that cleverly complement the coat.

History

The origins of dogs developed in the 20th century are much better documented than in older breeds, so we know in detail how wirehair vizslas were created in the 1930s. But here's the short version: Hungarian hunters and hawks wanted a dog with the same drive and versatility of their beloved Vizslas, but with a strong frame and a dense coat, to work in the puny terrain and cold weather of northern Hungary its better. He achieved this by a prudent cross of Vizslas and German wirehaired pointers.

General Appearance

Wirehair vizsla is a medium-sized, versatile Hunting Dog, bred for substance and a dense wire coat. Balanced in size and proportion, the Wirehaired Vizsla is strong and lean. The movement is powerful but beautiful with far-reaching drives that enable the breed to hunt in all elements and cover any terrain encountered by the walking hunter. The breed has an excellent nose for hunting and tracking on land and in water, as well as a natural point and retrieve. The most distinctive features of the breed are its weather resistant dense wire coat and its facial accessories, especially its beard and eyebrows. Natural appearance is essential for the type of breed, so wirehair vizsla should be shown with limited stripping and not punished for being shown to be in working condition:

  • Sinner,
  • Well muscular
  • With respectable markings.
Pros - Cons
Pros
This breed is easy to train, they require little grooming and are kid friendly
Cons
This breed is not very bright, they are not apartment friendly and are stubborn
Breeding

The gestation period in lasts for 60-64 days The primary period of the reproductive cycle of the female is called Proestrus and goes on for around 9 days. During this time the females begin to draw in males. The subsequent part is the Estrus when the bitch is receptive to the male. It goes on for around 3 to 11 days. The third part is the Diestrus. Usually, it happens around day 14. In this period the bitch's discharge changes for distinctive red and reaching its end. The vulva gets back to average, and she will no longer allow mating. The fourth part called the Anestrus. The time span between heat periods ordinarily keeps going around a half year. The litter size ranges between 6 to 8 puppies at a time'

Wirehaired Vizsla Grooming

The Wirehair Vizsla is something of a "wash and wear" dog, which requires only minimal grooming to maintain it in good condition. Wiping them with a damp cloth is usually sufficient in the middle of the bath. Using a grooming mitt or shedding knife on their coat during the shedding season can help keep the amount of hair they shed in your home down. Toenails should be trimmed every four weeks. Most people find it easier to do this while the dog is in the tub for their monthly bath. In order to avoid problems later in life, care system should be started at an early age.

Wirehaired Vizsla Training

The Wirehaired Vizsla is lively, happy and eager to please. They have a lot of energy and are very smart but get bored easily. This can sometimes make training a little harder, and you should work to keep training sessions fun, interesting, and not too long. He needs a light but firm and consistent hand in discipline; A Wirehaired Vizsla structure and limitations are needed. However, their nature is mild, and harsh words or corporal punishment should be avoided. They have a strong bond with their families, and can develop separation anxiety without proper conditioning.

Wirehaired Vizsla Nutrition

The Wirehair Wizsla is a high-energy dog ​​that needs a lot of exercise. They like to be around their people and are happiest working together. This makes the breed a great candidate as a canine partner for owners who like to hike, cycle or jog. It is imperative that they have opportunities to run freely - preferably in a safely fenced area, as their hunting instinct is very strong, and the dog will not be able to resist the urge to chase prey.

Wirehaired Vizsla Exercise

Wirehaired Vizsla should perform well on high quality dog ​​food, whether it is commercially manufactured or prepared at home with the supervision and approval of your vet. Any diet should be appropriate for the age of the dog (puppy, adult, or senior). All high-energy sports breeds require a nutrient-rich diet while working. This food is very different from the food they would need as a puppy, or as a motionless pet, or at different stages of life. WVs are very food oriented, so watch your dog's calorie consumption and weight level. Treatment training can be an important aid, but giving too much can lead to obesity. Know which human foods are safe for dogs and which are not. Contact your vet if you have any concerns about your dog's weight or diet. Clean, fresh water must be available at all times.

Wirehaired Vizsla Health

Wirehair vizsla is a generally healthy breed, and the breeders responsible for their reproductive stock for health conditions such as hyperuricosuria (sensitivity to kidney and bladder stones), elbow and hip dysplasia, subaortic stenosis, glaucoma, progressive retinal atrophy, and cataracts.

Read the official breed club health statement.

Recommended health tests from the National Breed Club:

  • Hip evaluation
  • Ophthalmologist evaluation